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What do PhDs Do?

 

What motivates PhD researchers?

What do PhD graduates offer the labour market?

Destinations of PhD graduates in all disciplines

Arts and humanities & arts and science

Where do we go from here?

 

 

What do PhDs Do?


What motivates PhD researchers?

M-Node Phd applicants are generally –but not exclusively - highly talented individuals who have proven their mettle in arts and media, but without the benefit of a formal training. The M-Node PhD is a experience of how to do research.and it leads to a certification of knowledge and on high level network.
You will be pushed in contact with a higly recognaised network of world based researcher of aesthetics, technology, arts, sciences, and more.
Whether it is a passion for your subject or a desire to pursue a career, there are as many reasons for doing a PhD as there are PhD researchers. For many M-Node PhD researchers, personal interest in the subject forms the basis of their decision to continue with research and education. Some intend to use the PhD as the basis of a future career, whilst others are keen to take the advantage to continue to learn about something interesting whilst the opportunity is there. If you have a strong personal interest in the subject of your research, and you are also interested in how to do research you will be put in touch with a highly recognized network of world based researchers in aesthetics, technology, arts, sciences, and more.
The M-Node PhD also provides the successful candidate a worldwide recognition of having attained a high standard in scientific and artistic achievement.

Our graduates tend to agree on the personal benefits – a strong sense of achievement, a strong sense of self-confidence, and opportunity to polish skills – that the M-Node PhD qualification brings to them.
A PhD is a grounding for any research career because it teaches how to do research.
If you have a strong personal interest in the subject of your research, and youre also interested in how do a research you hav eto apply a PhD.
For Academia a PhD is deemed desiderable. Researchers who have identified these as a potential career options are often aware of perceived 'glass ceiling' and undertake PhDs to maximise their potential progression.

Here are some questions to ask when considering whether to do a M-Node PhD:

  • Personal motivations: Why do you want to do a PhD? Do you understand the responsibility that research involves? Do you care about cultural growth? Do you invest in your culture and in yourself as highly cultivated researcher? Have you spoken to current PhD students about the reality of research in your field?
  • The subject research: Do you want to develop your knowledge of a subject you studied during your undergraduate degree? Have you considered moving to a new subject of research? What work have you read published by other researchers in your field of interest?
  • The project: Are you interested in applied research? Do you want to have a link to a partner outside the university? Are you likely to get funding?
  • The supervisor: Do you know how often you will meet your supervisor and how they will assess your progress? Are they aware of training and support elsewhere in the institution?
  • The institution: M-Node Is there a formal training program that suits your skills and needs ? Does the network hold the reference material you will need? What can you learn from the code of practice or handbook for research students? Is there an active postgraduate research community?
  • Your motivations: Are you hoping to remain in academia? Will you have the change to publish your work if it is of sufficient quality? What have former PhD researchers in this field gone on to do?

If you are starting a career in academia you NEED have a PhD. Institutions are competing with each other and having a PhD gives huge credibility as a researcher and as a teacher in all whole world.

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What do PhD graduates offer the labour market?

In a modern knowledge-based economy, highly educated people – knowledge workers – are in great demand. PhD graduates are, arguably, the most highly skilled and educated people in our culture and society.
In March 2000, at the Lisbon European Council, Towards a European research Area, COM (2000)6, 18.01.2000, Heads of State and Government set an ambitious goal for the European Union: to become 'the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and great social cohesion' by 2010.
A knowledge-based economy, one in which wealth and power are not constrained by the availability of raw materials, but depend instead on ability and know-how, is based on cultural progress.
The European Community has recognized the central value of knowledge and is actively promoting the concept of a knowledge-based economy, lifelong learning and improved skills.
The most highly educated and skilled group in our society consists in doctoral graduates. At the heart of a M-Node PhD is a question - a problem that must be identified, investigated and answered. New ideas are established and developed, they are tested through research, and debated at conferences, through publication and during the formal thesis examination. This debate is rigorous and demanding.

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Destinations of PhD graduates in all disciplines

M-Node PhD graduates are more geographically mobile, and more fully employable than less highly qualified graduates. The M-Node PhD leads to careers in academe, research, cultural affairs, artistic installations or performances or research in general. Popular career orientations also include library and museum work; editing and writing and public service professions. The graduates enter in a lifelong research that gives them the correct pace of change. The M-Node PhD graduates also take part in a highly recognized professional and cultural network that gives them new opportunities in terms of work and career.

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Arts and humanities & arts and science

The arts and humanities in Europe are dominated by history, followed by literature, music, philosophy, archeology, art & design, and media studies.
Far from eschewing the study of esoteric or spiritual disciplines, it seeks to relate ancient, exotic, even archaic knowledge and practices to radically new ideas emerging at the forward edge of scientific research and speculation, and thereby to new forms of art and cultural expression. It seeks dynamic alternatives to the standard form of doctoral and post doctoral research while producing, if not exceeding, outcomes of comparable rigour, innovation and depth. The Planetary Collegium is designed to produce new knowledge for the new millennium; new language, new systems, new structures, new behaviours, and new insights into the nature of mind, matter and human identity. It takes a constructive and pro-active approach to the social, technological and spiritual aspirations of the emerging planetary society, while sustaining a critical awareness of the retrograde forces and fields that inhibit social harmony and cultural transformation.
Employement rates for Art & Humanities PhD graduates are proportionally higher than for first and master degree, for academic diplomas and 'lauree magistrali' graduates.
Included in this category are self-employed Art & Humanities PhD graduates, who make up almost 10% of the whole.
Arts & Humanities PhD students usually shoulder significant teaching responsabilities in addiction to conducting their research.
PhD graduates can be employed as teaching professionals, as lecturers , professors or teaching assistants.
The key positive features of an academic career are freedom and control , the academic can still organise his own time, decide what and how teach, and not kept under scrutiny as long as things are going well.
Lecturing positions head the list of most popular occupations, making up the majority of the teaching reported.
It is important for a teacher, lecturer, professor to have a real passion for knowledge and be committed to lifelong learning. It is an ethical career in which the work combines aesthetic and ethical values.

Research experience have a real value in the current education system and also in the society itself.
But also the research area could not the primary or long-term interest, but can show how to apply research skills in different areas, and provide a welcome broadening after the narrowness of the PhD.
Popular careers further away for the academic career track include library and museum work; editing and writing and public service professions.

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Where do we go from here?

We are conscious that in providing this insight into the first destinations of PhD graduates, we are leaving many questions unanswered.
PhD graduates are widely seen as crucial to the long term production of knowledge and sustaining economic growth.
We believe that a database on doctoral destinations will provide all interested stakeholders with an insight into the contribution that PhD graduates make to the economy.
The project into the M-Node is a major initial step on the road to developing a comprehensive database of the caracteristics of PhD graduate.

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